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Saints Gone Before

An audio-book podcast in 10-20 minute episodes. Readings will come from Christian texts across the history of the church, from sermons to treatises to hymns to letters and more. Unless otherwise noted, readings are performed by Adam Christman and Jonathan McCormick. All readings are public domain documents. The theme song is "37 Echoes" by Dan-o of Danosongs.com. This is a companion podcast to our show on church history called "An Oral History of the Church"!
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Now displaying: March, 2017
Mar 27, 2017

You can't spell REFORMATION without C-A-L-V-I-N! ...ok, so, that's actually exactly what you can and should do. But still! John Calvin is a vital character to the story of the Reformation, and his seminal work is The Institutes of the Christian Religion. Originally published in 1536 in French, we're reading a translation by Henry Beveridge, completed in 1845 and available for free right now on CCEL.org.

Next week, we'll continue reading selections from The Institutes with Chapter 6!

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? Please e-mail us atchurchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Let us know how we’re doing, or what you’d like to hear more of!

Reader: Adam Christman

Mar 20, 2017

Ulrich Zwingli was a theologian and minister with one foot in the Magisterial Reformation and one foot in the Radical Reformation. He interacted quite a lot with his contemporary, John Calvin, as well as others. Today's text presents a glimpse at the heart of Zwingli's conflict with the Catholic church.

Come back next week for our first look at selections from John Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion!

The translation today comes by way of Selected Works of Huldreich Zwingli (1484-1531), edited by Samuel Macauley Jackson, translated by Lawrence A. McLouth, Henry Preble, and George W. Gilmore in 1901.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? Please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Let us know how we’re doing, or what you’d like to hear more of!

Reader: Adam Christman

Mar 13, 2017

Saints Gone Before is pleased to present the concluding episode of the Council of Trent, the Sixth Session, which clarifies Catholic doctrine regarding the subject of Justification in the Reformation era. This marks the end of current series of texts from the Catholic Reformation.

This translation comes by way of J. Waterworth, published in London by Dolman, 1848.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text, please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Let us know how we're doing, or maybe drop us a line just because! 

Next week: Zwingli!

Reader: Adam Christman

Mar 6, 2017

The Sixth Session continues in part 2, which is also episode 14, and we're all looking forward to Star Wars Episode VIII this December, which is the 12th month...

Ok, no more math for now. We're pleased to present another thought-provoking part of the Council of Trent, which clarifies Catholic doctrine regarding the subject of Justification in the Reformation era.

This translation comes by way of J. Waterworth, published in London by Dolman, 1848.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text, please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Let us know how we're doing, or maybe drop us a line just because! 

Reader: Adam Christman

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