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Saints Gone Before

An audio-book podcast in 10-20 minute episodes. Readings will come from Christian texts across the history of the church, from sermons to treatises to hymns to letters and more. Unless otherwise noted, readings are performed by Adam Christman and Jonathan McCormick. All readings are public domain documents. The theme song is "37 Echoes" by Dan-o of Danosongs.com. This is a companion podcast to our show on church history called "An Oral History of the Church"!
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Now displaying: February, 2017
Feb 27, 2017

Saints Gone Before presents a look at the Catholic Reformation, which followed and responded to the Protestant Reformation. It is a short series covered in four episodes. Today's reading is part 1 of the Sixth Session of the Council of Trent. It is one of the major councils of the Catholic Church and it occurred in the 1540's.

This translation comes by way of J. Waterworth, published in London by Dolman, 1848.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text, please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Or maybe drop us a line just because! Let us know how we're doing.

Reader: Adam Christman

Feb 20, 2017

Saints Gone Before presents a look at the Catholic Reformation, which followed and responded to the Protestant Reformation. It will be a short series covered in four episodes. Today's reading is the Fourth Session of the Council of Trent. It is one of the major councils of the Catholic Church and it occurred in the 1540's.

This translation comes by way of J. Waterworth, published in London by Dolman, 1848.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text, please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Or maybe drop us a line just because! Let us know how we're doing.

Reader: Adam Christman

Feb 13, 2017

The concluding episode of Martin Luther's Concerning Christian Liberty!

The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. If you’d like, you can follow along on archive.org.

This podcast takes requests! If you would like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text, please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Next week will see the first in a short series of readings from the Council of Trent!

Reader: Adam Christman

Feb 6, 2017

Listener, you may find the content of "part 4" a bit familiar. Due to my exhaustion and the lateness of the hour in which I recorded a previous episode, I accidentally read part 4 instead of part 3 and mis-labelled the episode. I have fixed the audio to correctly reflect which section THIS episode contains. In addition, I recorded the skipped section and released it as the newest version of "part 3" (listed as SGB 9). I apologize for the confusion.

The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. If you’d like, you can follow along on archive.org.

This podcast takes requests! If you would like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text, please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman

Feb 3, 2017

We had a mix up! Due to the lateness of the hour we recorded what we listed as SGB 9, "part 3" of this text, was actually part 4. We skipped a section! THIS episode with part 3 rectifies the situation with what is ACTUALLY part 3. Enjoy!

The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. If you’d like, you can follow along on archive.org.

This podcast takes requests! If you would like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text, please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman

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