Info

Saints Gone Before

An audio-book podcast in 10-20 minute episodes. Readings will come from Christian texts across the history of the church, from sermons to treatises to hymns to letters and more. Unless otherwise noted, readings are performed by Adam Christman and Jonathan McCormick. All readings are public domain documents. The theme song is "37 Echoes" by Dan-o of Danosongs.com. This is a companion podcast to our show on church history called "An Oral History of the Church"!
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
Saints Gone Before
2018
October
September
August
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: 2017
Dec 25, 2017

With no gift to bring that’s fit to give the King, pa rum pa pum pum, Saints Gone Before offers a special “Saints at Christmas” episode. The titles and authors for each short text is located in the show notes.

“A Creed for Christmas Worship.” It is adapted from Philippians 2:5-11 by Randolph W. Sly in vol. 5 of “The Complete Library of Christian Worship,” ed. Robert E. Webber.

“Ah, Dearest Jesus, Holy Child”, written by Martin Luther in 1535, translated into English by Catherine Winkworth.

“All Praise to Thee, Eternal Lord,” also by Luther (1524), translated anonymously in 1858.

A reading of Luke 2:1-40 from the King James Version (1611).

Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast (at) gmail (dot) com, or @OralHistoryPod on Twitter, or "An Oral History of the Church" on Facebook.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Dec 18, 2017

With a rudimentary lathe, Saints Gone Before is proud to present a reading of John Calvin’s “The Institutes of the Christian Religion.” This is the second reading of a short, two-part series consisting of Book Three, Chapter 7, “A Summary of the Christian Life. Of Self Denial.” The translation is by Henry Beveridge in 1845. Calvin’s Institutes have a significant impact on Protestant theology starting with its Latin first edition in 1536. Stay with us until the end of the episode to hear what we’re offering next Monday on Christmas Day, 2017.

Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast (at) gmail (dot) com, or @OralHistoryPod on Twitter, or "An Oral History of the Church" on Facebook.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Dec 11, 2017

With a conspicuous flange, Saints Gone Before is proud to present a reading of John Calvin’s “The Institutes of the Christian Religion.” This is Book Three, Chapter 7, “A Summary of the Christian Life. Of Self Denial.” The translation is by Henry Beveridge in 1845. Calvin’s Institutes have a significant impact on Protestant theology starting with its Latin first edition in 1536.

This new series is part 1 of 2 for a very short series. Come back next week for the final reading of Calvin on Self-Denial in the Christian life.

Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast (at) gmail (dot) com, or @OralHistoryPod on Twitter, or "An Oral History of the Church" on Facebook.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Dec 4, 2017

With an inaugural year, Saints Gone Before is proud to present Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 18. The translation comes by Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Today’s reading features Luther’s thoughts on “Extreme Unction,” and is the final reading in this text, which happens to coincide with the one year anniversary of our launching this podcast. For the name of next week’s reading, please stay tuned through the end of the episode.

Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast (at) gmail (dot) com, or @OralHistoryPod on Twitter, or "An Oral History of the Church" on Facebook.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Nov 20, 2017

With an iridescent persimmon, Saints Gone Before is proud to present Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 17. The translation comes by Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Today we're finishing his section on sacraments. Next Monday will be the final reading in this series! That means a different text is only 2 weeks away.

Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast (at) gmail (dot) com, or @OralHistoryPod on Twitter, or "An Oral History of the Church" on Facebook.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Nov 6, 2017

With a carbonated cliche, Saints Gone Before is proud to present Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 16. The translation comes by Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Today’s reading begins his discussion of orders. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the current volume (season) of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re wrapping up our discussion on the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses. Episodes 1 through 9 are available now. Episode 10 is the final installment, releasing this Friday, Nov. 10th, when we look at the legacy of Martin Luther.

Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast (at) gmail (dot) com, or @OralHistoryPod on Twitter, or "An Oral History of the Church" on Facebook.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Oct 30, 2017

With a clanging hammer, Saints Gone Before is pleased to present The Ninety-Five Theses of Martin Luther. We’re reading the full text today, including the introductory letter, the theses themselves, and a closing protestation by Luther. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. Historians largely believe he nailed the theses to the door of the church in Wittenburg on October 31st, 1517, unknowingly initiating Reformation Day 500 years ago this month. Others argue it happened in the first two weeks of November. Whenever that event happened, the world is better for this document.

Come back next week when we continue our reading of Martin Luther's "On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church" with part 16, where we pick up Luther's thoughts on the sacrament of Orders.

Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com, or @OralHistoryPod on Twitter, or "An Oral History of the Church" on Facebook.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Oct 23, 2017

With an increasingly-loud tummy rumble, Saints Gone Before presents Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 15. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Today’s reading concludes his look at the sacrament of matrimony.

Next week, on Monday, October 30th, we’ll pause our series of readings from Luther’s Babylonian Captivity in order to present a reading of the full text of Luther’s 95 Theses in honor of the 500th anniversary of their nailing to the door of the church in Wittenburg.

Requests for readings: churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com, or @OralHistoryPod on Twitter, or "An Oral History of the Church" on Facebook.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Oct 16, 2017

With an unflappable owlet-nightjar, Saints Gone Before presents Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 14. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. We continue our readings in his section on matrimony.

On Monday, October 30th, we’ll pause our series of readings from Luther’s Babylonian Captivity in order to present a reading of the full text of Luther’s 95 Theses in honor of the 500th anniversary of their nailing to the door of the church in Wittenburg.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Oct 9, 2017

With an inimitable flugelhorn, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 13. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Today we read his section on the sacrament of confirmation and begin his section on the sacrament of matrimony.

Reader: Adam Christman

Saints Gone Before created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Oct 2, 2017

With a sparkling howler monkey, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 12. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Today is the last reading in the section on the sacrament of penance! Next week is the first reading of Luther's take on the sacrament of confirmation. 

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? E-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by: Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced & Edited by: Adam Christman

#Reformation500

Sep 25, 2017

With a vacillating anachronism, Saints Gone Before presents Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 11. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Today is our first reading in his section on the sacrament of penance.

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by: Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced & Edited by: Adam Christman

Sep 18, 2017

With an acrobatic ferret, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 10 in this, our episode that answers the question to life, the universe, and everything. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture.

Next week, Luther looks at the 'sacrament of penance'! Sounds ominous!

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by: Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced & Edited by: Adam Christman

Sep 11, 2017

With an upside-down ennui, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 9. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the newest volume (season) of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re discussing the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses. Episodes 1through 5 are available now, and episode 6 becomes available this Friday, September 15.

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by: Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced & Edited by: Adam Christman

Sep 4, 2017

With a superfluous corn fritter, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 8. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. This episode continues Luther’s discussion of baptism. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the newest volume of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re discussing the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses. Episodes 1through 5 are available now, and episode 6 becomes available on Friday, September 15.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? E-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman.

This podcast was created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman; it is produced and edited by Adam Christman.

Aug 28, 2017

With an envious hummingbird, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 7. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. This episode opens Luther’s discussion of baptism. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the newest volume (season) of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re discussing the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses. Episodes 1, 2, 3, and 4 are available now. Episode 5 will become available on Friday, September 1.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? E-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman.

This podcast was created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman; it is produced and edited by Adam Christman.

Aug 21, 2017

With an acerbic larynx, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 6. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. This episode finishes his analysis of the Lord’s Supper. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the newest volume (season) of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re discussing the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther’s 95 Theses.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? E-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman.

This podcast was created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman; it is produced and edited by Adam Christman.

Aug 14, 2017

With a buoyant melodrama, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 5. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. We are currently in his analysis of the Lord’s Supper. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the newest volume (season) of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re discussing the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther nailing his 95 Theses to the Wittenburg church door. Episodes 1, 2, and 3 are available now. Episode 4 will become available on Friday, August 18th.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? E-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman.

This podcast was created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman; it is produced and edited by Adam Christman.

Aug 7, 2017

With a frenetic ardor, Saints Gone Before presents Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 4. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. We are currently in his analysis of the Lord’s Supper. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the newest volume (season) of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re discussing the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther nailing his 95 Theses to the Wittenburg church door. Episodes 1, 2, and 3 are available now. Episode 4 will become available on Friday, August 18th.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? E-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman.

This podcast was created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman; it is produced and edited by Adam Christman.

Jul 31, 2017

With an overt lucidity, Saints Gone Before presents to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 3. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. We are currently in his analysis of the Lord’s Supper. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the newest volume (season) of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re discussing the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther nailing his 95 Theses to the Wittenburg church door. Episodes 1 and 2 are available now, and episode 3 will become available on Friday, August 4th.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? E-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod.

Reader: Adam Christman.

This podcast was created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman; it is produced and edited by Adam Christman.

Jul 24, 2017

With a curious enthusiasm, we present to you Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church,” part 2. In this translation, it is rendered “The Babylonish Captivity of the Church.” The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883. Previously, we read Luther’s “Letter to Pope Leo X,” from a time when Luther was more…amicable with the Catholic church. “Babylonian Captivity” is a text in which Luther re-examines the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church in light of his readings of Scripture. Our episodes featuring “Babylonian Captivity” coincide with the newest volume (season) of our other podcast An Oral History of the Church. On “An Oral History of the Church,” we’re discussing the Lutheran wing of the Reformation in honor of the 500th anniversary of Luther nailing his 95 Theses to the Wittenburg church door. Episodes 1 and 2 are available now, and episode 3 will become available on Friday, August 4th.

Next week, we continue Luther's analysis of the Lord's Supper with part 3.

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by Adam Christman

Jul 17, 2017

A new series begins today! We're pleased to bring you Martin Luther's "On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church" to coincide with volume 3 of our other podcast, "An Oral History of the Church," in which we discuss the Lutheran Wing of the Reformation (episode 1 of volume 3 is available now!).

Today's reading covers the introduction to the Luther text, with sarcasm, insults, and insightful commentary all rolled into one. Next week, Luther digs into the subject of the Lord's Supper in earnest. The text comes from Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim, First Principles of the Reformation, London: John Murray, 1883.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? Please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Let us know how we’re doing, or what you’d like to hear more of!

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by: Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by: Adam Christman

Jul 10, 2017

Could it be the end???!?!? It is! .....of BB Warfield's essay, "Calvin's Doctrine of the Knowledge of God." We found the essay in Calvin and the Reformation: Four Studies, published by Fleming H. Revell Company in 1909.

Next week sees part 1 of Martin Luther's "The Babylonian Captivity of the Church."

Also! Our other podcast, "An Oral History of the Church," began a new volume on Friday on the Lutheran wing of the Protestant Reformation. Download it wherever you get this podcast!

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? Please e-mail us atchurchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Let us know how we’re doing, or what you’d like to hear more of!

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by: Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by: Adam Christman

Jul 3, 2017

Presenting part 8 of BB Warfield's "Calvin's Doctrine of the Knowledge of God. Part 9 wraps us up next Monday!

Announcement: Our other podcast, "An Oral History of the Church," returns on Friday! This volume will discuss the Lutheran wing of the Protestant Reformation. We're excited; we hope you enjoy it.

The Warfield essay comes from Calvin and the Reformation: Four Studies, published by Fleming H. Revell Company in 1909.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? Please e-mail us atchurchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Let us know how we’re doing, or what you’d like to hear more of!

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by: Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by: Adam Christman

Jun 26, 2017

"Ball of confusionnnnn!" Is that really what the world is today? Warfield tries to clear some up in today's reading.

Today’s episode features part 7 of B. B. Warfield’s essay, “Calvin’s Doctrine of the Knowledge of God.” The essay comes from Calvin and the Reformation: Four Studies, published by Fleming H. Revell Company in 1909.

Come back next week for part 8.

Would you like to request a specific book, sermon, or other Christian text? Please e-mail us at churchhistorypodcast@gmail.com or tweet us @OralHistoryPod. Let us know how we’re doing, or what you’d like to hear more of!

Reader: Adam Christman

Created by: Jonathan McCormick and Adam Christman

Produced and edited by: Adam Christman

1 2 Next »